Stephanie Hurt – Romance Author

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Too much emotion in your writing?

6 Comments

Can you put too much emotion in your writing? I’ve heard some writers say they thought that they’d showed too much emotion from their main characters. But in my opinion, the emotion is what draws readers in. Recently I sent out an excerpt from one of my works in process, “Faith Through the Tears”. Several people came in and said the emotional pull was what drew the in.

The excerpt was a very powerful part of the book where the main characters wife dies of cancer. It’s detailing the emotions that both were going through in her last hours together. It’s an emotional time, how on earth do you pull back on that? 

I thought about several classic books and if the writer had pulled back on the emotions. It would have screwed up the whole story.

Take Gone With The Wind for instance. When she does the pivotal scene where she falls face down in the garden and eats raw vegetables, then stands up and makes that famous speech about “Never being hungry again.” The emotion is strong, but if Margaret Mitchell had pulled back and Scarlett had just stood there without putting her fist in the air and speaking in a strong tone it wouldn’t have had the same affect.

Emotion is an integral part of our writing and passion includes emotion. So keep the emotion in and make it strong. Go for it, cry a little, laugh a lot and never slack up on the emotion. 

As always, good writing and May God Bless You…

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Author: stephaniehurt

Stephanie Payne Hurt has been writing stories since she was a teenager, but only started publishing her work in 2012, 30 years later. The romance genre drew her in at an early age. Since 2012 she's published over 15 Romance novels/novellas. Stephanie is a busy lady. She's a Children's Minister, Accountant, wife and mother along with a blogger and writer, along with starting a publishing service called Horseshoe Publishing alongside her publisher. It's been an exciting ride and she looks forward to what the future holds for her writing. Currently she writes romance ranging from Christian, Contemporary, Suspense and Cowboy. Her work is available at many online retailers, on her website and in a bookstore in Zebulon, Georgia near her home. Come by and visit her at http://www.stephaniehurtauthor.com/ and subscribe to get updates and release dates, also her monthly newsletter! Don't forget to join her Street Team for all the new updates and to get free chapters of upcoming books and lots of other prizes.

6 thoughts on “Too much emotion in your writing?

  1. Good point! The emotional life of characters is so important. For me, I never have a problem with the emotions, but sometimes the words used to describe them can turn me off. Good post!

  2. If the emotions are put there for the purpose of making the reader feel the emotion it may be too much emotion. However, this is all based on reader to reader, so a writer should put in the amount of emotions that they feel is necessary. Unnecessary emotion would be what many call sentimentality: this is the idea of killing a dog or a child just because it makes people sad when it has no point to the story or furthering the plot. If the emotion is central to the story then it is important to keep it, no matter how much it is.

  3. I only ever object to emotions in books if they catch me unawares lol you know the ones, you are sat reading in a public place the characters and stories have you in their grip, you cannot close the book you have to read on then it happens you are sat in a public place sobbing until you finally close the book because you cannot see to read any further

    • I know exactly what you’re saying. I was at my son’s school waiting on him to get out of football practice and crying like a baby. He came out and thought someone died. I told him they did and he panicked. I had to explain quickly. I try really hard not to over emphasize it too much in my writing. Have a wonderful day…

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